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in the future saying this is a low growth environment. the new norm. as a result, they are all competing for the same market share, which typically, leads to pricing pressure. there's not a bigger pie growing. it's, rather, how do we slice up the pie today. >> spreeing to hear in light of the fact that the stock market is back to historic highs, but that's driven by profits of companies saying they may not have the leverage any longer. interesting to see they feel slower growth in the brick countries, but hope coming from beyond that. >> yeah, uh-huh. this year, the brick countries historically slowed down a little. you have optimism from china in the last six months, but they are moving into the next generation being a malaysia, indonesia, africa, turkey, and the like. corporates focus on that rise in consumer for opportunities to diversify the revenue stream and go after the growth. >> fascinating. look at the consumer at home and what's going on here and holding back, they are worried about the impact of higher taxes on the consumer. 77% of the american population saw the paycheck shr
his state of the union address. protecting the environment has long been hollywood issue as you know. no, i wasn't there but the organization that i'm involved with, rain forest action network, their people were there. and -- >> so when you heard the president speak last night about climate change and that we must do something about climate change, was that enough for you? >> no, no. i mean, look, i'm a huge supporter of obama's. it's the first president i ever donated money to. but i think in terms of climate change and the environment, he's been at best disappointing. i thought it was decent rhetoric and i don't know if there's any teeth to this but, you know, look, it's complicated. he can't -- i think politicians feel like it's political suicide to be talking about the environment. the time has come when we're in a planetary emergency here. i think he could be using the bully pulpit more here. >> last night he said for the sake of our children and future we must do more to combat climate chang. we can choose to believe that superstorm sandy and the worst drought in decade -- >> w
is a matter of social justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question
on a baseball field tonight. if there is any event deserving of this incredible mix of environment, it is your foundation. tell us about what is happening. >> first of all, hearts after dark is an amazing event to benefit the hospital and commerce center which is the only level one trauma center here in in the city and a hospital for people without insurance. >> really raising every single dollar you can tonight is of utmost importance pour the san francisco community. >> yes, it is. money we raise tonight helps fund programs so when you that wouldn't get funded otherwise. that help patients and families. >> i saw on line, one in eight people would be effected and need some sort of trauma center help. and the event likely unfortunately is sold out for tonight. but stephanie, you are telling me people can go onien and donate. >> absolutely. can you good on the website and make a donation right now if you like. >> all right. >> in support of the foundation and we would just be thrilled. on valentine's day, a perfect gift for us. >> thank you so much, stephanie. we appreciate you coming out. let'
and it is destroying the environment so we have to do away with it. >> story that will warm your heart. two 7 year olds spend the day together. they have a special bond. what it is. what do we do when something that's hard to paint, really wants to be painted? we break out new behr ultra with stain-blocker from the home depot... ...the best selling paint and primer in one that now eliminates stains. so it paints over stained surfaces, scuffed surfaces, just about any surface. what do you say we go where no paint has gone before, and end up some place beautiful. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. behr ultra. now with advanced stain blocking, only at the home depot, and only $31.98 a gallon. >>> she made headlines for competing in the olympics. and oscar pistorius is making head lines for something different. we have videotape of him arriving in south africa. he broke down after being formally charged with a count of murder in the death of his girlfriend. they will pursue a premeditated murder charges against him. the magistrate delayed the bail hearing and ruled he will be held
of climate change and the environment, he's been at best disappointing. i thought it was decent rhetoric and i don't know if there's any teeth to this but, you know, look, it's complicated. he can't -- i think politicians feel like it's political suicide to be talking about the environment. the time has come when we're in a planetary emergency here. i think he could be using the bully pulpit more here. >> last night he said for the sake of our children and future we must do more to combat climate chang. we can choose to believe that superstorm sandy and the worst drought in decade -- >> well, that's great. but let's not drill in the arctic, which he was promoting. i think, you know, i think that he could be doing more for regulations with the environmental protection agency. some of the things that have come up they've ignored. i think he could be doing a lot more. it takes a lot of political courage. we're at a time when it comes to jobs and growth, people don't want to hear about it. we've got a cancer going on in this planet. we don't always see it but we're starting to see the finger
weeks in a controlled environment, and hope for a special kind of chemistry. >> chemistry is when 25 guys know their role and they know if they do their role, it can be expanded. that's good chemistry. >> reporter: the nats have already started to develop that chemistry and also seem to be in step when it comes to confidence which trickles down from the skipper who sounded the first shot in the off- season saying it's world series or bust. >> that's what everyone thinks you know. i've been thinking that since 2004 when i was in the minor leagues and thinking they we have to win the world series this year. but i mean obviously you set high expectations for years. now they've come to reality. >> i think that's what every team should think going into spring training. immingle obviously you have your doubts and -- i mean obviously you have your doubts and you know how realistic that is. i would hope they would say yes. >> so they're confident and they have chemistry. you put them together and there could be one more c.. championship. >> it's more about 25 guys taking care of number one,
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> it will be cooler today. cold front on the way for tomorrow. i mine, it will get much, much colder on tuesday. more on that coming up in about five minutes. >>> 7:13. firefighters are still working to contain a large fire burning at a metal recycling center in tampa, florida. they are using both water and foam to try and control the flames. within the past 30 minutes we learned that two diesel tanks are filled with not ammonia but calcium nitrate. they say that chemical is less reactive but still dangerous. >>> a state lawmaker says the state may be pushing too hard to recover money from feel who start wildfires. the sacramento "bee" reports for the past eight years, california has aggressively pursued individuals and businesses who start fires. that money is used to cover the costs of fig
to believe them. melissa: how do you pick your bets in this environment? do you buy the index? do you buy etf? do you buy real estate? >> i like etf's. you know that. the symbol is rfp. it says if it is a broadening, rising market, you want to get into the goal weight etf's. you want to get the equal movement. melissa: david kotok, thank you so much for coming on. lori: senate democrats are offering an alternative plan. republicans already saying it does not stand a chance. here is rich and sends in washington with the latest. rich: congress settle taxes earlier this year. they are offering a minimum 30% effective tax rate for income for more than a million dollars. cutting spending on the military that appears to drop anyway. ending direct farm subsidies. the white house approves saying republicans in congress face a simple choice. do they protect investments and health care or do they continue to prioritize and protect tax loopholes that benefit the very few? republicans are waiting for the senate to vote first. >> when the senate passes a plan, we will be happy to take a look at it. until
that are better places to the entrepreneurs and others. >> we need to provide an environment that says we want you to do good business and create jobs but also going to support u.s. people in your own personal agendas to help your community and nation and someone. connell: what are you doing? >> united nations foundation made a commitment to entrepreneurs to help them stepped into not only their business but their philanthropy and using their technology and innovation to help solve global problems. connell: where are you making the most progress? are there surprising results? people would say go to the united states go to silicon valley there are plenty of entrepreneurs but are there other places where it is surprisingly you are seeing strong growth in entrepreneurs? >> in the development space is interesting, not just charity anymore but i am going to create some innovations that might save lives. if you look at malaria deaths have been cut in half in 11 countries in the last five years that is the cause technology of the long-lasting, entrepreneur created. connell: not just people throwing money
of the city, which was fountain square and environs. >> infrastructure. >> we had an infrastructure strategy. develop the banks, which is the river front. and begin to redevelop -- >> not your banks. the banks of the river. >> i was on board. >> the banks of the river. not the other banks. to your point, at the local level, a group came together, it was clearly in all of the stakeholders -- >> and that's a lot better than going to the federal government begging for that money and then the rest of the 49 states pay for it. >> it's all about leadership. if somebody has the courage, you know, to make a declaration about what winning might be, i think you'd be surprised at the number of americans that would stand up and stand behind it. >> so, a year ago, we'll just, you know, you did run. &g, we'd be remiss. >> three years ago. >> right. but a year ago, i looked at your successor and he was, i mean, there were -- did you make barbarians at the gate? who did you say made that up? >> eddie -- >> but he did and you got in trouble for saying it. anyway, for whatever reasons, mcdonald's was under as
in a closed environment and it is similar. >> well, put that inin perspective, because katrina is a major devastation and we were on a frigging cruise ship having a good time and from that angle, i get it because of the isolation of the communication, but two different things, two different things. >> what was it like when you were first to talk to someone? >> great. getting through to my wife and being able to talk to my kids for a little bit to say, hey, i'm out here all right is awesome to be able to do that. you know, you speak to them a couple of days on the cruise and, you know nashgs was good to be p able to have that, knowing that i'm okay, and the ship is still here and we are not sinking or anything like that. >> will you go on a cruise again? >> i would. i mean, it will take a while and not like next week or anything and i would hate for this to happen in alaska, because that would be brutal, but at least it was good weather and people were out and having the best of it. >> you had a coat. we were talking to two people with the robes on from the bathroom without a coat. >> yes,
would land. we focused on those environments because the trajectory was that you could land in the desert or the jungle. so we did that. we also did a lot of geology training. i don't recall any training that we did that i felt in the end was worthless that we wasted our time. we did thousands of hours in the simulator, learning how to fly. we did a lot of geology, i probably got a masters degree in geology during my six years of training. the training was very thorough on apollo and we felt well prepared. >> we have time for one more question. way out in the back there. >> hi. i'm a student member of the explorer's club. you mentioned being on the backside of the moon alone would have been a strange experience. i want to know if space exploration is part of the human experience or is it more of a technical kind of quest. when you were on the moon or on your way to the moon, did you feel more human, less human or just the right amount of human? and what is your favorite sci fi movie? >> it was a human, experience. in fact, there is an exhibition -- exhibit touring with nasa
for environments where there's not a lot of resources. >> because so many competitors all around the world that's what they train for their whole lives. and to -- it's sad to think they would get rid of so many people's dreams of competing in the olympics. >> a dream he's not ready to give up. >>> a broken pipe on the peninsula has spent thousands of gallons of chlorinated water kills an estimated 400 fish. the small amount of chlorine in the water makes it safe to drink but it can be deadly to fish. they confirm fish kill include steel head trout. the san francisco euc says workers added chemicals and are releasing water upstream now to try to die lute the chlorine. >>> a disabled carnival cruise ship is slowly being towed to mobile alabama. it has had no running walter since sunday when the fire knock out power. more than 400 passengers are complaining about overflowing toilets and long lines for food. the ceo of carnival is apologizing for the conditions. it is expected to arrive in alabama late tomorrow or thursday. >>> reinventing government, a ktvu exclusive. >>> new visit -- video from
of sports are huge for environments where there's not a lot of resources. >> because so many competitors all around the world that's what they train for their whole lives. and to -- it's sad to think they would get rid of so many people's dreams of competing in the olympics. >> a dream he's not ready to give up. >>> a broken pipe on the peninsula has spent thousands of gallons of chlorinated water kills an estimated 400 fish. the small amount of chlorine in the water makes it safe to drink but it can be deadly to fish. they confirm fish kill include steel head trout. the san francisco euc says workers added chemicals and are releasing water upstream now to try to die lute the chlorine. >>> a disabled carnival cruise ship is slowly being towed to mobile alabama. it has had no running walter since sunday when the fire knock out power. more than 400 passengers are complaining about overflowing toilets and long lines for food. the ceo of carnival is apologizing for the conditions. it is expected to arrive in alabama late tomorrow or thursday. >>> reinventing government, a ktvu exclusive. >>> >>>
's a lot of money. you have to put it somewhere. >> if you're going to wait for the political environment to get better, you're going to be an old man. >> you can't wait for washington. get on with running your business. it's filibustering over hagel adds more fuel to the fire. >> yeah. >> so you just have to get on running your business. we haven't seen any change in climate behavior. also there's a better mood, we have not seen that translate into significant change for climate behavior. we think 2013 will be similar to 2012 because we did have the olympics and the presidential election. which you remember. >> i remember. >> you remember the results closely. it will be similar to 2013. digital will be strong. data, technology will be strong. but same general tone. so we don't see the real world having changed at all, really. >> there's one other -- oh, okay, we're going to go to the weather. but berkshire in adm. >> berk share made some new moves. you have new people making investment decisions there, too, todd and ted. but as for berkshire hathaway, it did take a new state and aerch mi
be potentially serious problem. you have to realize this is a captive audience. this is a closed environment. and many things could potentially go wrong. in general, carnival and all the other cruise lines are very good about dealing with these situations. >> i know you're a doctor and not an attorney, but i'm wondering if the illnesses that came as a result are real enough to where any kind of lawsuits would have a standing chance in court? >> again, i'm definitely not an attorney, but in general, there's a possibility that they could prove a case. anyone that flies or drives or gets in a ship knows there are a risks to that. this is kind of an unusual situation, but i would say the litigation would be handled appropriately. >> doctor, while the passengers may have gotten off the ship, are there any sort of lingering concerns out there? could there be illnesses or injuries that develop after they've left the ship? >> that's a great question. potentially, i would be careful to look for bacterial infections, diarrhea. people could be very stressed about this afterwards. post-traumatic stress
into an environment where everyone is not lined up the way that you believe in think after time you suspect it to wear on you. i do not justify any one point out to kill someone else, but when you have been under stress and he had a lot of the motion and he wasn't good at expressing himself. >> williams says that she kind of expected this type of behavior and that dorner used to stress overwork. >> here is a live look outside at walnut creek. there is a lot of sunshine perry e. >> the san francisco mayor ed lee and community groups are standing up against domestic violence today. there hosting the 1 billion rising event. that is part of the global day of action to end violence against women and girls by encouraging congress to reauthorize the violent act ce against women act. >> attendees will gather at 11:00 this morning a delors part. the group will then dancers effort cisco mission district for attending a 1 billion rise campaigning at city hall at 4:00 this afternoon. >> president obama is hitting the road campaign style today to try to push you gently put forward in tuesday said of the union addr
significantly, down 7.3%, at $13.16 a share. talking about their environment, obviously, there's a tough environment trying to sell old-school books and compete with amazon. you talk e-readers, and that's putting them under pressure today and the nook. talk about the nook and outlook, they talk about a loss for 2013, more than expected, more than of a loss than they thought, and as a result, the stock is tanking. back to you. >> thank you very much, nicole. leapfrog jumping ahead. profit up 90% year over year, and sales rising 16% in the fourth quarter could be a 28% pop in full year revenue. john bash -- john barber, the ceo, you had earnings, down 20% in six months. what's wrong with the picture? >> well, it's actually 70% in 12 months -- >> you joined the company, i believe? >> two years ago. we had four of the top ten selling products last year. i'm a holder of leap frog and excited. i believe the market will have the opportunity in the near future. >> the company came up with the first leap pad, in i think, 1999 or so, surprised they didn't have the ipad, coasted on your coat tails,
bringing investigative reporting to the civil-rights story and the other is the fbi environment, killing, the meridian bombing, the attempted set up by the fbi that led to the arrest of tommy terence, murder in athens. tell me if you would the impact having that kind of news coverage on the movement had on sort of the national understanding of what was going on. >> we really understood the press as educational tv. everything that had been going on that we were involved in had been going on for 100 years. it was hard to get it out. because this is 1963, i was reminded that fred shuttlesworking to get martin luther king on the seventeenth of december to promise he would come to birmingham this year but that is because on the fourteenth or fifteenth fred's church had been bombed for the third time in 1962. there had been 16 bombings of homes that receive no publicity. fred shuttlesworth was quite frank that he needed martin luther king to come over there to give intention to this in just this. one of my other good friends, a guy who had been with us in the movement from camera man, was quit
see a lot more of a, you know, much more competitive wholesale environment this quarter. >> corinna, would you recommend buying the shares here? >> it is a little difficult to recommend starting new positions, but we most certainly would be holding on if we did own it already. >> all right. great to speak with you. thanks for your time. >> thank you. >>. >>> when we come back, what does art cashin want to hear from the president in tonight's state of the union? he'll tell us here at post 9. one more look at futures on this fat tuesday. we'll try to let the good times roll when "squawk on the street" comes right back. [ kitt ] you know what's impressive? a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ how do traders using technical analysis streamline their process? at fidelity, we do it by merging two tools into one. combi
last year in what it termed a deteriorating environment for press freedom. the committee to protect journalists says 232 journalists were jailed last year, the highest number since surveying began in 1990. 70 journalists were killed in a line of duty, an increase of more than 40% from the previous year. a top native american leader is urging house lawmakers to reauthorize the violence against women act and follow tribal governments to prosecute non- native men who abuse women on tribal lands. jefferson kiel, president of the national congress of american indians, made the remarks thursday in the state of indian nations address. he said the death rate of native women on some reservations is 10 times the national average. nearly 60% of native women are married to non-native men, and according to justice department data, non-native men carry out 70% of reported rapes against native women. >> today, tribes to not have the authority to prosecute non- natives who beat, raped, or even kill women on tribal lands. state and federal authorities are often hundreds of miles away without the loc
. i mean, when you put 4,000 people together in a closed environment, it creates a situation where you can have any type of gastrointestinal illness take over. but for the most part, cruise ships do handle these situations well. and this was a specific so this can carry a little bit of high risk, but for sure, i'm sure, you know, carnival cruise line did everything possible, and hand sanitizers were used as much as possible. and hopefully everything will be okay after this. >> yeah. all right, well thank you very much. please don't go anywhere. we'll be needing to talk to you in a bit. >> let me introduce you to the atkins family. this is a family i talked to earlier in the day. rusty, ben, and this must be brianna. >> that's right. >> welcome back. >> happy valentine's day. looks like they remembered. >> somebody certainly remembered. how do you feel? >> excited to be on land. i kissed it when i first got off. >> you did? literally benlt down and kissed it? wow. >> you're not the first to tell us, actually. there were a number on people getting on the ground. for you now to be back wi
environment, it may not actually make the most sense. if you're paying less than 4% on your mortgage, if you can -- you can take that money and put it into retirement investing, you could make even conservatively 4%, 6%. that may be a smarter way to spend that savings. >> okay. what if i'm in debt? how do i deal with the debt issues and save for retirement? >> here's something that might be a little controversial. but you don't want to enter retirement with a lot of high priced debt. what we're talking about are credit cards, maybe student loans that you took on for your kids or auto loans. you want to pay that off. you might be paying 8% 10%, 12% on. that here's the controversial part -- maybe for a while you want to step back your retirement savings and put this money into paying down that debt. if you're paying 12% on debt that's going sap your retirement. nay off as soon as you can. >> donna rosato. thank you. >>> from saving your money to saving your strength. a ceo of an energy project explains why you might be more productive just by taking it easy. she'll explai
% of business owners that were surveyed identified the current environment as a bad time to expand and political uncertainty topped the list for the reasons not to attempt economic growth. lee, a resident of muskogee, oklahoma, and president of acme corporation, said a lot of small businesses had to go in debt to stay afloat. he said now they can't make the money they need to to pay down debts due in large part the environment the government has created. i joined a small group of members in congress. i have faced unprecedented difficulties ensuring my business succeeded. i step on the floor of the united states house of representatives with a firsthand understanding how high the hurdles are for a business to succeed and just simply jump over. last month when president obama was sworn into his second term, i was reminded of something he said four years ago in his first inauguration. the president said, "the question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small but whether it works, whether it helps families finds a job at a decent wage, care they can afford or retirement tha
, which was that incident command posts will be a target rich environment. here he is holed up in an apartment that almost has a view directly on the command post on the other side of the road with a automatic sniper rifle with.50 caliber sniper bullets. so was that the first place he could find to get into? or two, did he choose it because it would give him an observation post and potentially a target. >> are you aware how far the broken down truck was from that location? >> i was told it's not that far away. this might have been the first place he encountered. about the search, because you asked about that, they would check houses and if there was any forced entry, they would go in and check that house to determine did that have anything to do with him, was he still there? if there were houses unlocked, they would check those. but where there was sign of no forced entry, that was a sign that this was in tact. they didn't make a forced entry to places already locked. so you could consider a scenario where he would have found an unlocked place or found a hidden key, made an ent
and the environment has been for them. that's -- you know, that's tough. again, you asked earlier about specific health conditions, and i wanted to be fair about that, i just don't think that's a real risk. i mean, i think -- you hear about nor row virus outbreaks for example on cruise ships, that can happen because people are living in close quarters or contained in close quarters, if one person gets sick, many people can get sick. that's true whether a cruise ship is in distress like this one is, or it's not. you're absolutely right. it's still a miserable experience it sounds like. >> it totally is. the cruise industry is growing all the time. that's why we're following this so closely, such a big part of people's lives. i'll be checking in with you, thank you for coming back to you. i'll talk to you soon. for these people, they were supposed to be having fun. this is a vacation. when it goes so long, and it could have been in greater jeopardy out there in the open sea, it raises our concern. thankfully they're all coming home now, we're going to keep following this story as the cruise ship d
it be water or food or ships. >> absolutely. when you put 4,000 people in a closed environment, it creates a situation where you can have any type of gastrointestinal illness take over, but for the most part, cruise ships do handle these situations well, and this was a specific situation. so this can carry a little bit of high risk, but for sure, i'm sure, you know, carnival cruise line did everything possible, and hand sanitizers were used as much as possible. and hopefully everything will be okay after this. >> yeah. all right, well thank you very much. please don't go anywhere. we'll be needing to talk to you in a bit. >> let me introduce you to the atkins family. this is a family i talked to earlier in the day. rusty, ben, and this must be brianna. >> that's right. >> welcome back. >> happy valentine's day. looks like they remembered. >> somebody certainly remembered. how do you feel? >> excited to be on land. i kissed it when i first got off. >> you did? literally benlt down and kissed it? wow. >> you're not the first to tell us, actually. there were a number on people getting on the
dislocation that could be catastrophic. i don't care whether you are talking the environment, economy, education, health, the prison system, the justice system. we have a large number, the ngo movement, non-governmental organization, public interest movement is wide and diverse but don't relate to this 50 years ago. what it doesn't have is a cohesive sense that they are working on related problems that ought to create a sense of movement that we are indebted to our history if our history were more accurate. i think history is about the future and the future is -- if the future is dangerous, then it will be less dangerous and more hopeful with a better sense we have of our history. but i am a historian. i guess you could expect me to say that. i am trying to put it in a different way. >> i want to thank you for the wonderful work you are doing. i have grandchildren i definitely want to share it with. my question is about another age group. as i look around this room, i see a number of white males of a certain age who probably lived through much of the times you are talking about at som
when you go into that environment where everyone else is not maybe lined up with the way you believe in and the way you think, after, you know, time you could -- the stress could probably wear on you. >> meanwhile, irvine police told the "orange county register" that dorner did research on a woman and her fiance prior to killing them. police tied dorner to the slayings after reading a manifesto he wrote in which he sought revenge against those he believe ended his law enforcement career. >>> a former california mayor admits she stole more than $2 million from charity but says she had a brain tumor at the time. maureen o'connor took the money from her husband's foundation. the one-time san diego mayor went on a decade-long gambling spree from 2000 to 2009 in which she wagered more than $1 billion and lost millions. in a plea deal o'connor pled not guilty to money laundering and her trial will be delayed for two years while she works to repay the money. >>> coming up a little bit of sports. the eyes of the world on bay area college hoops. we have th
in a much more urban environment or maybe it's fortunate. it is a very urban and compact environment. moving a lot of snow piles are going to require heavier equipment. >> reporter: governor asking all nonessential employees to stay home. a lot of businesses closed today, jon. the streets as i mentioned are relatively quiet. that is good thing as they try to clear the snow. jon: it is a heavy snow too. it is a lot of moisture in there. it is hard to dig out. >> reporter: but good for snowballs. jon: always finding a bright spot. rick leventhal in ham den, connecticut. jenna: a fox news alert for you boeing out to california where police are offering a one million dollar reward for information leading to the capture of christopher dorner, a name you are now familiar with. this is the former cop accused of killing three people and sparking a multi-state manhunt. william la jeunesse is live at l.a.p.d. headquarters with more on this story. william, police have up the ante. >> reporter: having declared war on the l.a.p.d. the department responded in kind this weekend, labeling him a domestic ter
to thank our chairman on the environment and public works committee, chairman boxer, for the briefing she held today with a number of scientists, including one who spoke specifically about the human health effects that we can see from climate change. climate change is threatening to erode the improvements in air quality that we have achieved through the clean air act. e.p.a. enforced emissions reductions have led to a decline in the number and severity of bad air days in the united states. these are the days that -- i know the presiding officer is familiar with because i'm sure they happen in connecticut as well as in rhode island -- where the air quality is so poor that it's unhealthy for sensitive individuals -- the elderly, infants, people with breathing difficulties -- to be outdoors. even healthy people are urged to limit their activities when out of doors. in rhode island, about 12% of children and 11% of adults suffer from asthma. both are higher than the national average. our rhode island public transit authority runs free buses on bad ozone days to try to keep car traffic down be
go into that environment where everyone else is not maybe lined up with the way you believe and the way you think, after, you know, time, you could -- the stress could probably wear on you. i don't think it's in any way justifiable, someone going out and killing anyone because they're stressed out at work. there are ways and outlets of releasing stress. chris unfortunately was one of those people he bottled up a lot of his emotions and wasn't very good at expressing himself. >> he didn't have close friends? he didn't talk to his mom? >> i believe he did have a good relationship with his mother and some of his close friends, but even, i think, in the manifesto he lists how he just sort of alienated himself from everyone towards the end. >> did he think he was better than everyone else? that manifesto is so narcissistic, isn't it? >> completely. everything is i was always the best and somehow i was done wrong. >> i mentioned that yesterday. one time i think maybe sort of as a light note -- i kind of have to laugh about something in this or else it makes you a little crazy in y
the merits of the way he trains. ill he' say in the training environment, the reason it's not a public video when you're doing any kind of training it evokes a lot of emotions to people and in this case to diversity. at usda a big part of the work they're doing is working with migrant workers and populations in fact broadly minority and i think that that's important that exists. there's a reason by the way, fortune 500 companies invest in this training because it does impact the way a workplace environment works, there's data to support that. spending in in area is important giving the work they do. we can question his training style and what worked and didn't for you, but i think the value of it is inherent in the data that does exist out there. >> the business we should make them say-- referring it pilgrims as illegal aliens, illegal immigrants, get some pushback and people want them referred to as undocumented workers. it's interesting to see that federal taxpayers effectively taking a side by saying, you if you use the term illegal alien, it's racist, it's got, you know, it's completely
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